Air Pollution Control Act






The Air Pollution Control Act (APCA) of 1955 was the first legislation on air pollution enacted by the U.S. federal government. It resulted after a number of failed attempts, initiated by California's representatives, in the Senate or Congress. Air pollution had long been regarded as a local problem, and the federal government was hesitant to interfere with states' rights. As a result, APCA was rather narrow in scope and effect.

According to the law, the Public Health Service was authorized to spend $3 million per year for five years to research the effects of air pollution and provide technical assistance, research, and training in the area of air pollution to state and local air-quality districts. No money was appropriated for the control of this problem.

APCA was amended in 1960 and then again in 1962, with requests to the Surgeon General to conduct research on the relationship between motor vehicle exhaust and human health.

SEE ALSO A IR P OLLUTION ; L AWS AND R EGULATIONS , U NITED S TATES .

Internet Resource

American Meterological Society Web site. Available from http://www.ametsoc.org/AMS .

Christos Christoforou



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