Arbitration






Arbitration is a process in which disputing parties abandon their right to litigate or appeal to the judicial court and instead put their case before an impartial third party who renders an opinion or recommendation. If the arbitration is nonbinding, the parties may choose to accept it or not. If it is binding, the parties must abide by the decision, which has the force of law and can be enforced. Parties may voluntarily submit to arbitration rather than incur the costs of litigation. Courts may also force parties to go to arbitration. Examples of cases that have gone to arbitration concern the location of gas pipelines and liability for paying for pollution cleanup.

SEE ALSO C ONSENSUS B UILDING ; E NFORCEMENT ; L ITIGATION ; M EDIATION ; P UBLIC P OLICY D ECISION M AKING ; R EGULATORY N EGOTIATION .

Internet Resource

U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution Web site. Available from http://www.ecr.gov .

Susan L. Senecah



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