Environmental Impact Statement






The U.S. National Environmental Policy Act of 1970 (NEPA) requires that all federal agencies prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prior to making decisions that could have a significant impact on the environment. An EIS includes a description of the proposed action; alternatives to the action, including the "null" (no action) alternative; a description of the environmental context; expected impacts and irreversible use of resources; and ways to potentially lessen such impact. Impacts are broadly defined to include discussion of natural systems, human health, and the man-made environment. A draft EIS is then circulated to government agencies, in some cases Native-American tribes, and other interested parties for comment. The final EIS must include responses to any substantive comments received on the draft.

For the sake of efficiency and improved public participation, regulatory agencies frequently combine pollution-release permit review with the EIS process. Impact mitigation that is within the scope of the regulation, such as water discharges, can be required as an enforceable condition of the permit. From the outset of NEPA, courts have held that citizens and environmental groups have "standing" to challenge the adequacy of an EIS. This potential for protracted litigation provides the incentive for involving interest groups throughout the decision process. Many states and countries have adopted EIS requirements similar to those of NEPA.

SEE ALSO A CTIVISM ; E NVIRONMENTAL M OVEMENT ; E NVIRONMENTAL P ROTECTION A GENCY ; I NDUSTRY ; L AWS AND R EGULATIONS , I NTERNATIONAL ; L AWS AND R EGULATIONS , U NITED S TATES ; N ATIONAL E NVIRONMENTAL P OLICY A CT (NEPA) ; P UBLIC P ARTICIPATION ; .

Internet Resource

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NEPA Web site. Available from http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa .

John P. Felleman



User Contributions:

Fitry
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Mar 18, 2013 @ 2:14 pm
So let me get this straight. They kilonngwy break the law, REPETITIVELY. When they get caught and action is taken against them then they say you cant sue me or take legal action against me because I promise not to do it again. So if that is the proper way to do things why do we have hundreds of thousands of people in prisons and jails?? I am sure they all promised not to do it again. And if this is truely the letter and spirit of the laws. . . .Well I know some people that was produced in a pool during low tide that need permenently removed. I promise after they are gone I wontspray agent orange on any one else. Laws is just laws right. If its okay for them to break the ones they want to and then recant why cant we break the ones we want and recant? I see things very black and white. Either its okay for everybody or not okay for anybody.

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